Download Andy Luttrell - Psychology for the Mentalist PDF

TitleAndy Luttrell - Psychology for the Mentalist
TagsSocial Psychology Color Psychology & Cognitive Science Thought Parapsychology
File Size32.1 MB
Total Pages241
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zzBackCover
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Psychology
For the

Mentalist

Andy Luttrell

Page 120

only "hit" on one of two instances of mind reading.

R~ther t.han reveal the nuances of Josh's clever thinking as it applies to
his particular book test, I provide you here with a corollary effect that
operates on similar principles, but the point is really to demonstrate
the pratfall subtlety.

Scribbledeedoo (Effect)
Effect: The performer asks a participant to consider all the cards in
a deck and to think of just one of them. Although he tries to pick up
on exactly what the card is, he ultimately gets it wrong. When he tries
again, however, he gets it just right. In fact, upon later reflection, he
wasn't even that far off the first time.

Explanation: This is just a dressed-up one-ahead method. Begin by
asking someone to think of any card in a deck and repeat the name of
that card mentally, over and over again. The idea here is that they're
getting used to the sound of the card's name rather than visualizing it.
This is important only in that it justifies part 2 of the effect.

The participant truly has the freedom to think of any card at all, and
at this point, you just make a guess, and make it a genuine guess. If
you've been tooling around with various"real"mind reading methods,
you may be pretty good at this. Let's say you guess "Jack of Diamonds:'
Write that guess down on an index card, just above the center (see
image panel a). Now that you've committed yourself to your guess,
ask the participant to say the card she has been thinking of. 16

Almost assuredly, you will be wrong. If you happened to be right, or
even close to being right, you have a miracle on your hands. Clean,
propless mentalism. Just turn the card around and quit while you're
ahead. But in the statistically likely event that your guess is reasonably
far away from correct, proceed as planned. Let's say she says that she's
been thinking of the "6 of Spades:'

It's at this moment that you can apply the pratfall technique. A look

16 " ... because I want everyone to be as amazed as you will be." Don't forget the "because"

technique!

-119-

Page 121

of embarrassment overcomes you, and you let out an "okay ... " as you
scratch out the guess you had just written down. This always gets a
laugh.

a. b. c.

At some level, nobody expected you to get this right anyway, and
it's a humanizing moment to own up to what has to be a pretty big
failure, based on your nonverbal reaction. In fact, however, although
you are genuinely crossing something out on the index card, you're
crossing out blank space. What you're really doing is scribbling a line
in the space above the guess you had written (see image panel b).

Why would you scratch out blank space? Because people can't easily
tell the order in which things are written on a piece of paper- we
tend not to notice layers of ink and only notice patterns of ink. In a
moment, you'll write something on top of this scribble line, and later
it will look as though it was written first.

"Okay, "you say." Let's try that again. I may have given both of us a little too
much freedom to let our minds wander. Playing cards are combinations
of numbers, colors, and symbols, so it can be a little slippery to make too
much meaning of them when we're just thinking about them. Let's make
it a little more concrete."You take out an actual deck of cards, give them
a quick mix, and spread them for the participant to see their faces.

"These cards are very visual, as you can see by how they appear so
distinct from one another. Just take one of the cards at random and
really pay attention to how the card looks:' At this point, you control the
Jack of Diamonds (or whatever card you actually guessed earlier) to a

-1 20-

Page 240

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