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Titleilo evaluation
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.4 MB
Total Pages126
Table of Contents
                            Acknowledgement
The evaluator also wishes to thank Mr. Jealous Chirove, Chief Technical Advisor and Employment Specialist of ILO Country Office for the United Republic of Tanzania, Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda and Mr. Robert Mawanda, National Project Coordinator...
Acronyms
I. Executive Summary
Overall, the project management structure was only partly effective due to the lack of staff given the project’s scope and coverage, but it allowed for reaching sustainable and meaningful results. The YEF-EU project team received adequate administrati...
	ILO tried to involve different categories of beneficiaries - not only youth aged 18 - 35, but also young people living with disabilities and HIV/AIDS. This was done through the Y2Y Fund. In total, the project disbursed 15 grants to PWDs. The project a...
II. Background and Project Description
	2.1. Project context0F
	2.2. Project description
III. Purpose, Scope and Clients of the Evaluation
IV. Evaluation Methodology
	4.1. Key Activities
	4.2. Data analysis
	4.3. Limitations to the evaluation
	4.4. Outline of the report
V. Evaluation Findings
	5.1. Relevance and strategic fit
	5.2. Validity of project design
	5.3. Project effectiveness
		training. The selection of trainees for SIYB training was drawn from groups, associations, cooperatives and out of school drop outs. Interviews with SIYB trainers showed that the tool which is used for selection of trainees, i.e. SIYB Entry Form and B...
	5.4. Efficiency of resources use
	5.5. Effectiveness of management arrangements
Figure 10: Funding disbursed by the EU during 2014-2016
Figure 10 displays the implementation rate, which constituted 61 per cent in 2014, 72 per cent in 2015, 82 per cent in 2016 and 100 per cent in 2017 (January-February).
The overall delivery rate for the period 2014 - 2017 from the planned budget constituted 79 per cent, while the utilisation rate of the total funds received by the project was 87 per cent.
The YEF-EU project team received adequate administrative and technical support from the thematic units at the ILO HQ and ILO DWT/CO Pretoria, a particularly long-standing collaboration was formed with the Small Enterprise Unit and the Youth Employment...
	5.6. Inclusiveness
		ILO tried to involve different categories of beneficiaries - not only youth aged 18-35, but also young people living with disabilities and HIV/AIDS. This was done through the Y2Y Fund. In total, the project disbursed 15 grants to PWDs.
		The project also promoted combatting with HIV and AIDS by embedding HIV and AIDS awareness messages into its meta-level advocacy campaigns, and by mainstreaming HIV and AIDS into market place interventions, introducing HIV/AIDS in the SME workplace tr...
	5.7. Impact orientation
	5.8. Sustainability
Turning hibiscus flowers into wine and juice
Processing of rabbit meat by youth
As per the tax law, the SMEs44F  are obliged to pay a number of taxes, including: (1) income tax (30% of the net profit), (2) VAT (18%), (3) Pay As You Earn (P.A.Y.E) (averagely 30% of the gross income earned), (4) withholding tax (6%-15%), (5) tradin...
6. Conclusions and Recommendations
	6.5. Conclusions
	6.6. Recommendations
The design of any subsequent Phase of the Project in the youth employment sector should focus more on: (a) operationalisation of the national youth policies on the local level; (b) adding value to educational systems through development of BTVET curriculum for diploma courses; (c) put more focus on addressing youth financial inclusion from a macro level by establishing a link between financial access and financial inclusion for young people; (d) exploring further the potential for using the mobile technology for improving access to financial, employment and entrepreneurial services, especially for rural or other hard-to-reach youth populations; (e) introducing innovative approaches to financing  such as micro-consignment, which is a low-risk and flexible sales model that can be used to identify, train and inspire young entrepreneurs and  educate consumers about low-cost, socially beneficial products and increase access to those products; (f) developing gender integrated youth projects to benefit equally both women and men and meet their needs.
7. Annexes
	Annex 7.1. Terms of Reference
	Annex 7.2. List of Documents Reviewed
	Annex 7.3. List of Interviews, Meetings and Site Visits
	Annex 7.4. Indicators of Project Achievements disaggregated by five strands of activities
	Annex 7.5. Evaluation tools
	7.5.2.  Focus Group Guidelines
		Questions
	7.5.3. Survey Questionnaires
	Annex 7.6. Lessons Learned and Emerging Good Practices
                        

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