Download Lessons Learned from Post-Disaster Recovery in Yogyakarta and Central Java, Indonesia PDF

TitleLessons Learned from Post-Disaster Recovery in Yogyakarta and Central Java, Indonesia
TagsEmergency Management Indonesian Rupiah Infrastructure Disaster And Accident Economies
File Size1.1 MB
Total Pages24
Table of Contents
                            THE RECOVERY POLICY AND PROGRAM
REGULATORY AND INSTITUTIONAL REFORM ON DM
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Dr. Suprayoga Hadi ([email protected])
Director for Special Area and Disadvantaged Region

LEARNING FROM THE INDIAN OCEAN TSUNAMI:
Asian Development Bank's RESPONSE IN INDONESIA

Manila, 7-8 December 2009

REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA
STATE MINISTRY FOR NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING/

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AGENCY

mailto:[email protected]

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Magnitude : 6,2 Richter scale
Occurred at 5.55pm for 57 seconds
Epicenter in the Indian Ocean at about 33
kilometers south of Bantul district
Human toll: 5,716 killed
The damage was very heavily concentrated on
housing and private sector buildings

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In reference to Bappenas’ 2 years evaluation on rehabilitation and reconstruction,
funding gap FY 2008 identified on the are a as following :

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Funding
Needs

Funding
Available

Funding
Gap

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1. The National Coordinating Board for the Management of Disaster (BAKORNAS
PB), along with provincial and local authorities took a lead role in coordinating
emergency response mechanisms on the ground and work together with the
UN’s Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC), and non-UN Agencies

Immediate requirements after the disaster: shelter support, water and
sanitation, health and nutrition, child protection and education, emergency
telecommunication, logistics, early recovery, and coordination

2. Very different donor response compared with the Aceh 2004 tsunami
a) The interim support prior to the start-up reconstruction diminished by early

2007.
b) The number of remaining international agencies thereafter small: ie UNDP,

GTZ, JICA, AUSAID followed by some major donors joining the Java
Reconstruction Fund.

c) The total donor assistance for Yogyakarta and Central Java approx. 15% of
total IDR 7.9 trillion allocated funding by the end of FY 2008.

3. Contrasting funding situation:
a) Multi Donor Fund Aceh-Nias: $ 676.08 million in commitments
b) Java Reconstruction Fund: $ 94,76 million in commitments

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A national post disaster reconstruction fund may be an alternative mechanism
to address current and future disaster response in Indonesia; it should have the
following features:

1. Provide flexible financing instrument for systematic response to disaster,
preferably for longer-term and future use if desired

2. Have a streamlined approval process through flexibility in preparation, use
of emergency and early recovery procurement procedures and policy for
rapid response to crisis and emergency

3. Have a focus on financing critical post disaster needs ie: housing,
community infrastructure, livelihoods, disaster risk reduction, technical
assistance for quality assurance, monitoring and evaluation

4. Government-led with appropriate roles for the participating donors, when
possible the secretariat attached to the lead government institution

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