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TitleLSSA Guide to Lean
File Size1.5 MB
Total Pages74
Table of Contents
                            Dealing with Links
About this eBook
Acknowledgements

About LSS Academy
Chapter 1: What is Lean Manufacturing?
Chapter 2: Finance 101 by Taiichi
Chapter 3: The Forgotten M’s
Chapter 4: Waiting
Chapter 5: No Standards, No Kaizen
Chapter 6: Standard Work
Chapter 7: Why Flow Counter Clockwise?
Chapter 8: Jidoka - The Forgotten Pillar
Chapter 9: Heijunka in the Front Office
Chapter 10: Why Heijunka? – Part 1
Chapter 11: Why Heijunka? – Part 2
Chapter 12: Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED)
Chapter 13: OEE – Not Just for TPM Programs!
Chapter 14: Value Stream Mapping Overview
Chapter 15: How to Create a PQPR Matrix
Chapter 16: Current State Value Stream Mapping
Chapter 17: Future State Value Stream Mapping
Chapter 18: Introducing the Kaizen Newspaper
Chapter 19: Two Types of Kaizen
Chapter 20: Kaizen Rules: 1&2
Chapter 21: Kaizen Rules: 3&4
Chapter 22: Kaizen Rules: 5&6
Chapter 23: Kaizen Rules: 7&8
Chapter 24: Kaizen Rules: 9&10
Chapter 25: Repent, I mean Hansei!
Chapter 26: Is Laying People off Really Anti-Lean?
Chapter 27: Shadows or Reality
Final Words
Recommended Reading
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

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Page 2

Table of Contents

DEALING WITH LINKS ................................................................................................................................... 4

ABOUT THIS EBOOK...................................................................................................................................... 5

................................................................................................................................ 6ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ABOUT LSS ACADEMY .................................................................................................................................. 8

......................................................................................... 9CHAPTER 1: WHAT IS LEAN MANUFACTURING?

........................................................................................................ 11CHAPTER 2: FINANCE 101 BY TAIICHI

............................................................................................................. 13CHAPTER 3: THE FORGOTTEN M’S

................................................................................................................................. 14CHAPTER 4: WAITING

................................................................................................. 16CHAPTER 5: NO STANDARDS, NO KAIZEN

.................................................................................................................. 18CHAPTER 6: STANDARD WORK

...................................................................................... 20CHAPTER 7: WHY FLOW COUNTER CLOCKWISE?

......................................................................................... 22CHAPTER 8: JIDOKA ‐ THE FORGOTTEN PILLAR

........................................................................................... 23CHAPTER 9: HEIJUNKA IN THE FRONT OFFICE

................................................................................................... 25CHAPTER 10: WHY HEIJUNKA? – PART 1

................................................................................................... 29CHAPTER 11: WHY HEIJUNKA? – PART 2

...................................................................... 32CHAPTER 12: SINGLE MINUTE EXCHANGE OF DIES (SMED)

.............................................................................. 35CHAPTER 13: OEE – NOT JUST FOR TPM PROGRAMS!

................................................................................ 37CHAPTER 14: VALUE STREAM MAPPING OVERVIEW

CHAPTER 15: HOW TO CREATE A PQPR MATRIX....................................................................................... 39

   
 

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Chapter 14: Value Stream Mapping Overview 

One of,  if not the single most powerful  lean tool available 
to  us  is  value  stream mapping  (VSM).  The  reason  it’s  so 
powerful is because of its relevancy. 

You  see,  it doesn’t matter  if  you are  an  accountant who 
sits  behind  a  desk,  or  a  nurse  caring  for  the  sick,  or  an 
assembler  building  a  Toyota  Camry  ‐  value  stream 
mapping can help you see wasteful activity in a new way. I 
guarantee it. 

 

Definition of a Value Stream 

A  value  stream  can  be  defined  as  all  the  steps  –  both  value  added  and  non  value  added  – 
required  to  take a product or  service  from  its  raw materials  state  into  the waiting arms of a 
happy customer. 

VSM Overview 

Initially, value stream mapping can seem a bit intimidating. There are lots of funny looking icons 
and zig zaggy lines that upon first glance seem to do nothing but confuse things. But once you 
understand what you are looking at you will be hooked forever. 

Like most things related to lean and six sigma there are some general steps to follow when we 
create value stream maps. Here is how I do it. 

Step 1: Identify the Product Family 

The first step I recommend you take is to identify the product family you wish to map. The tool 
to use  for  this  is a PQPR  (Product Quantity / Product Routing) matrix. This  tool will help you 
identify which product or in some cases products to focus in on. 

I cannot stress how  important  this step  is.  I have seen  too many excited people  run out and 
start mapping  the  first product or process  they  see. While value  stream mapping anything  is 
better than nothing you definitely want to focus your efforts on the most important areas first. 

Step 2: Create a Current State Value Stream Map 

Once you  identify what  to map you and your motley crew must  set off and create a current 
state value stream map. 


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As the name implies we are interested in how things look today. We are not interested in how 
things “should”  look or were “designed” to  look. No, we want to draw reality onto a piece of 
paper. 

The piece of paper is a key point. While I am a big advocate of using software to draw our final 
maps up, I cringe when I see people attempting to go straight to the computer. 

A stopwatch, oversized piece of paper, pencil, and good eraser are all you need at this point. 

Step 3: Create a Future State Value Stream Map 

Now that we have a better understanding of the current state of affairs, which is typically one 
eye opening experience by the way, we are ready to draw a picture of how we would like things 
to look in the future. 

Typically, as an example, we aim to make things  flow and reduce the amount of  inventory or 
waiting in between steps. 

It’s at this point when people get to dream a little. You know, create the ideal working place. 

Step 4: Create an Action Plan 

Now that we know how things are working today and how we would like to see them working 
in the future it’s time to form a plan. 

There are a variety of templates available for this. The key is not which kaizen newspaper or A3 
report you use –  instead  it’s that you and your team know exactly what needs to happen and 
when it needs to happen. 

In short, we form the plan… then execute the plan! 


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Recommended Reading 
 

Taiichi Ohno's Workplace Management

One of my all time favorites.  In this book we enter inside the mind of the chief 

architect of the Toyota Production System.  A must read. 

 

Lean Thinking

This was one the first lean books I read.  It changed me and helped launch me onto 

my existing career path.   

  

Learning to See

This is the bible on how to create value stream maps.  It teaches you how to “see 

waste” in a new way. 
 

 

Creating Continuous Flow

After learning to see waste you must learn how to make value flow.  This is the book 

to teach you how. 
   

Creating Level Pull

Once material is flowing we must think about pull.  Learn all about kanban in this 

excellent resource. 

   

The Toyota Way

A true masterpiece.  Dr. Liker goes inside the company that started it all and shares 

how Toyota does what it does. 

   

The Toyota Way Fieldbook

The sequel to the The Toyota Way.  In this book we take a deep dive inside the tool 

box that is lean manufacturing. 

   


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