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TitlePhysical Fitness
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TagsPhysical Therapy Fitness
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages193
Table of Contents
                            PHYSICAL FITNESS: TRAINING, EFFECTS, AND MAINTAINING
PHYSICAL FITNESS: TRAINING, EFFECTS, AND MAINTAINING
CONTENTS
PREFACE
ACTIVE VERSUS PASSIVE RECOVERY: METABOLIC LIMITATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OUTCOME
	ABSTRACT
	INTRODUCTION
	ACTIVE RECOVERY AND BLOOD LACTATE
		The Intensity and Mode of Active Recovery
		The Duration of Active Recovery
		Muscle Blood Flow and Lactate Removal
	THE RATIONALE FOR USING ACTIVE RECOVERY
	EFFECTS OF ACTIVE RECOVERY ON MUSCLE Η+ AND LACTATECONCENTRATION, PCR AND GLYCOGEN
		Muscle pH and Lactate after Active and Passive Recovery
		PCr Resynthesis after Active and Passive Recovery
		Muscle Glycogen after Active and Passive Recovery
	ACTIVE RECOVERY AND  RESTORATION OF PERFORMANCE
		Active Recovery versus Passive Recovery between Short Duration (4 to 30  s) Sprints
			Performance in cycling and running sprints
			Performance in swimming sprints
		Active versus Passive Recovery between Long Duration (40 to 120 s) Sprints
			Performance in swimming sprints
			Performance in cyclingsprints
			The effects of intensity of active recovery on sprint performance
			The effect of exercise mode during active recovery
			The effects of active recovery duration on performance
			Active recovery during various types of exercise
		Active Recovery Following a Game or Training Session and Performance
			Performance in team sports
			Performance in individual sports
	CONCLUSION
	REFERENCES
PROMOTING PHYSICAL FITNESS, EXERCISE TRAINING AND SPORT FOR INDIVIDUAL WITH MENTAL RETARDATION
	ABSTRACT
	INTRODUCTION
	MENTAL RETARDATION: DEFINITION, CAUSES, CLASSIFICATION AND THERAPY
	HEALTH-RELATED PHYSICAL FITNESS, EXERCISE TRAINING AND SPORT ACTIVITIES
	CONCLUSION
	REFERENCES
LOW COST PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAMS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN OF INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY: IMPROVING CARDIO-VASCULAR FITNESS, FUNCTIONAL ABILITY AND MUSCLE STRENGTH AND REDUCING INFIRMARY VISITATION
	ABSTRACT
		Background
		The Interventions
	INTRODUCTION
		Exercise Programs for Ambulatory Individuals with IDD
		Exercise Programs for Non-Ambulatory Disabled Individuals with IDD
		Existing Programs for Severely Disabled Individuals with IDD
		Summary of Introduction
		Methods
			Project 1 [44]
			Project 2
			Project 3
	RESULTS
		Project 1
		Project 2
		Project 3
	DISCUSSION
	SUMMARY
	REFERENCES
EFFECTS OF CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN ON PHYSICAL FITNESS
	ABSTRACT
	REFERENCES
USING MENTAL TRICKS TO ENHANCE PHYSICAL FITNESS
	ABSTRACT
	INTRODUCTION
	BACKGROUND
	PROPOSED EXPERIMENT
	EXPERIENCE AND ILLUSION
	CONCLUSION
	REFERENCES
CAN ACTIVE VIDEO GAMES IMPROVE PHYSICAL FITNESS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS?
	ABSTRACT
	INTRODUCTION
	AN INTRODUCTION OF AVG
	RATIONALES OF USING AVG TO PROMOTE PA AND PF IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS
	THE EFFECTS OF AVG ON PROMOTING PA AND PF IN CHILDREN SND ADOLESCENTS
	POTENTIAL CHALLENGES FOR AVG RESEARCH
	CONCLUSION
	REFERENCES
STAYING FIT DURING AND AFTER PREGNANCY
	ABSTRACT
	INTRODUCTION
		Physical Activity during Pregnancy
		Outcomes of Pregnancy Exposed to Exercise
		Maternal Benefits
		Placental Adaptations
		Fetal Outcomes
			Measuring fetal stress
		Neonatal Outcomes
			Neonatal and long-term outcomes
		Exercise during Lactation
		Types of Physical Activities
		Application
	CONCLUSION
	REFERENCES
THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF AEROBIC ACTIVITY AND PHYSICAL FITNESS IN YOUNG PEOPLE
	ABSTRACT
	I. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ACTIVITY,  HEALTH AND FITNESS IN YOUNG PEOPLE
		I.1. Definitions of Physical Activity, Health and Fitness
		I.2. Physical Activity Guidelines and Young People
		I. 3. The Adult-Child Relationships between Physical Activity, Health and Fitness
		I.4. Physical Activity, Health and Fitness of Children
		I.5. Hypoactivity/Deconditioning due to Illness - Asthma and Obesity
	II. FITNESS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY  IN CHILDREN WITH DISEASES
		II.1. Children with Asthma
			II.1.1. Background
			II.1.2. Asthma and physical activity
			II.1.3. Asthma and aerobic fitness
			II.1.4. Recommendations
		II.2. Obese Children
			II.2.1. Background
			II.2.2. Obesity and aerobic fitness
			II.2.3. Exercise training, body composition, blood profile and aerobic fitness
			II.2.4. Recommendations
	III. PROMOTION OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND FITNESS SCHEMES – POLICY AND PRACTICE
		III.1. Environmental Factors
		III.2. School Factors
		III.3. Local and National Government Policies
	IV. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
	REFERENCES
INDEX
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1







Page 2




SPORTS AND
ATHLETICS
PREPARATION
, PERFORMANCE
,
AND PSYCHOLOGY








PHYSICAL FITNESS
: TRAINING
, EFFECTS
, AND MAINTAINING
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ny other professional services.



Page 96





83 Figure 11. Pre-post muscle strength measurements of GM muscle, participants (1-4)

Vs. control (5)
Figure 12. Pre-post task performance time measurements, research (1-4) Vs. control

(5)
7.2 7.3 5.3 10.8 7.5 3.3 6.2 1 5.8 7.6 02468101212345Participants
Index: Pre-intervention
Post - intervention
Muscle Testing Evaluation
3.532.521.510.50


Page 97




Lotan Meir
84 Task performance
Mean task performance time which was
measured at 7 minutes and 42 seconds at the beginning of the

intervention program and was reduced at termination of program to 4

min. and 12 sec. This measure showed a constant and significant

improvement (
P<0.025
) for all four participants. The control
participant showed a small non significant change (for the worse)

(Figure 12).
DISCUSSION
The present interventions were set to examine the feasibility and results of
short term low budget intervention programs for individuals with IDD and the

results highly support the implementation of such programs.
The presented programs evaluated the contribution of a low graded
physical intervention program for children and older adults with cognitive

impairment. Baseline, pulse measurements of the participant's at all three

programs indicated very poor physical condition, thus exercise level at the

initial point was low, and the ongoing progress was gradual.

Results show that pulse at rest (correlated with aerobic fitness) and

during exercise, dropped significantly as a result of all intervention

programs, suggesting that at very low physical fitness (common

among people with sedentary life style at all ages), even moderate

intervention programs have a significant influence on physical fitness.
Results show that a training program can cause a change in the

participant's functional ability, and that this change is correlated with

aerobic capacity. These results suggest that the poor functional ability

of this population might be attributed, at least in part, to their poor

physical state. Yet such assumption needs further investigation.
The reduced infirmary visitation observed for the research group



prior to intervention, manifested by an exaggerated need for medical

attention. The training programs might have caused a change in such

perception, yet such assumption needs further investigation.
The results shows that low graded, low cost, physical intervention has

impressive results, with reduction in infirmary visitation which by



Page 192




Index
179 strength, viii, x, 29, 30, 45, 54, 57, 58, 69,
71, 76, 81, 85, 87, 89, 92, 97, 98, 99,

101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 115, 138, 145,

147, 151
stress, 30, 40, 128, 130, 140

stretching, 70

stroke, 7, 31, 33, 34, 95, 104, 125, 154

stroke volume, 7, 95, 125

subacute, 99

substance abuse, 48

substances, 134

substrates, 9, 124, 138

successful aging, 95

suffering, 145

sugars, 127

superimposition, 51

supervision, 52, 86, 136
supply, xii, 93, 94, 100, 122, 123, 124, 126,
127 surface area, 129, 131, 136

survival, 59, 151

survival rate, 151

symptoms, 49, 135, 152

syndrome, 87, 88, 92, 93, 97, 156, 163

synthesis, 38, 39, 116

systolic blood pressure, 147
T task performance, 75, 83, 84

team sports, 13, 26, 35

television, 56, 116, 149

temperament, 139

temperature, 125, 153

temporal, 148

teratogen, 125, 129

teratogenic, 123, 124

test items, 55

test scores, 50, 59, 160

TGF, 134

therapists, 53, 72

therapy, 88, 96, 104, 151

thermoregulation, 140

thinking, 53, 104

threshold, viii, 2, 5, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28,
29, 34, 35, 40, 41, 42, 125, 128
thresholds, 35

thyroid, 133

thyroid gland, 133

time frame, 104

tissue, 63, 94, 104, 127, 129, 155, 156, 167

training programs, x, 70, 84, 92, 96

trans, 129

transformation, 105, 122

transition, 56, 135

transport, 123, 146, 157, 158, 160

trauma, x, 101, 126, 128, 135

trial, 13, 26, 76, 98, 164

triggers, 151

triglyceride, 147, 156

triiodothyronine, 133

TSH, 133

turnover, 93, 99

type 2 diabetes, 151, 154

type 2 diabetes mellitus
, 154
U UK, 112, 143

ultrasonography, 139

ultrasound, 130

umbilical cord, 130

United Kingdom, 148

United States, 98, 147, 154, 162

urban population, 92

uterus, 123, 125, 129
V values, 134, 153, 155

variability, 139, 164

vasoconstriction, 123

vasodilation, 123

vegetables, 127

velocity, 5, 23, 24, 26, 30, 33, 34, 64

vessels, 123, 129, 135

video games, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 117,
118, 119
visual attention, 113, 115, 140
Volunteers, 73, 75



Page 193




Index
180 W Wales, 160, 165

walking, viii, 24, 41, 45, 57, 71, 73, 76, 85,
89, 94, 135, 155, 157, 158, 164, 165
waste products, 129, 157

water, 144, 153, 157

water quality, 157

Wechsler Intelligence Scale, 47

weight control, 156
weight gain, 136, 158

weight loss, 157, 163

weight status, 149

well-being, 126, 130, 137

WHO, 146, 167

women, xi, 69, 73, 95, 99, 121, 122, 123,
124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 135, 136, 137,

138, 139, 155, 165
World Health Organisation, 161, 167

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