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TitlePlutarch Lives, II: Themistocles and Camillus. Aristides and Cato Major. Cimon and Lucullus
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LanguageEnglish
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OEBCLASSICAL LIBRARY

PLUTARCH'S LIVES
II

THEMISTOCLESAND CAMILLUS
ARISTIDES AND CATOMAJOR

CIMONAND LUCULLUS

Translated by

BERNADOTTEPERRIN

Page 2

.00

Complete list of Loeb titles can
be

found at the end of each volume

PLUTARCH (Plutarchus, c. A.D. 45-
iio, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia

in central Greece, studied philosophy at

Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a
teacher in philosophy, was given consular

rank by the emperor Trajan and
a procura-

torship in Greece by Hadrian.
Married

and father of one daughter and four sons,
he appears as a man of kindly character
and independent thought. Studious

and

learned, he wrote on many subjects. Most

popular have always
been the 46 Parallel

Lives, biographies planned
to be ethical

examples in pairs (in each pair
one Greek

person and one similar Roman), though
the last four lives are single. All are

in-

valuable sources of our knowledge of the

lives and characters of Greek and Roman
statesmen or soldiers or orators. Plutarch's

many other varied extant works,
about

60 in number, are known as 'Moral

Essays'
or 'Moral Works'. They are of

high literary value,
besides being of great

use to people interested
in philosophy,

ethics and religion.

Page 330

PLUTARCH'S LIVES

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316

Page 331

MARCUSCATO, iv. 4 -v. 4

penny, was dear ; also that he bought lands where

crops were raised and cattle herded, not those where
lawns were sprinkled and paths swept.

V. These things were ascribed by some to the
man's parsimony ; but others condoned them in the
belief that he lived in this contracted way only to
correct and moderate the extravagance of others.
However, for my part, I regard his treatment of his
slaves like beasts of burden, using them to the
uttermost, and then, when they were old, driving
them off and selling them, as the mark of a very
mean nature, which recognizes no tie between man
and man but that of necessity. And yet we know
that kindness has a wider scope than justice. Law
and justice we naturally apply to men alone ; but
when it comes to beneficence and charity, these
often flow in streams from the gentle heart, like
water from a copious spring, even down to dumb
beasts. A kindly man will take good care of his
horses even when they are worn out with age, and
of his dogs, too, not only in their puppyhood, but
when their old age needs nursing.

While the Athenians were building the Parthenon,
they turned loose for free and unrestricted pasturage
such mules as were seen to be most persistently
laborious. One of these, they say, came back to the
works of its own accord, trotted along by the side of
its fellows under the yoke, which were dragging the

waggons up to the Acropolis, and even led the way
for them, as though exhorting and inciting them on.
The Athenians passed a decree that the animal be
maintained at the public cost as long as it lived.
Then there were the mares of Cimon, with which he
won three victories at Olympia ; their graves are

317

Page 660

Other Biographers in the Loeb Series

SUETONIUS

CORNELIUS NEPOS

DIOGENES LAERTIUS

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