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Table of Contents
                            Time and Life Management for Medical Students and Residents
Title Page
Copyright
Dedication
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgment
Introduction
About the Book
Part I The Eagle’s Perspective—“Macro”
	Chapter 1 Goals
	Chapter 2 Roles
	Chapter 3 Regeneration
	Intermezzo: You Are the Boss (of Your Life)
Part II Boots on the Ground—“Micro”
	Chapter 4 From Goal to Action
	Chapter 5 Sorting
	Chapter 6 Planning Your Week
	Chapter 7 Acute Disaster Management: Three Major Points
	Chapter 8 Anxiety Management: The “Power of Now” Approach
	Chapter 
9 Networking
	Chapter 10 The Mentor
	Chapter 
11 The Need for Reevaluation
	Chapter 
12 The Art to Learnfrom Errors
Epilogue
Recommended Readings
Recommended Video
Recommended Software
Reference
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 43

Fig.i.eps


33
5.2 Time Matrix/Eisenhower’s Principle

you cope with the moment, and the day and the week. But that is
it. You waste your energy and your future in daily firefighting. And,
while you are putting out fires, you are inadvertently covering the
back of someone who has time to work on his goals. What you need
is an intelligent triage system. I recommend President Eisenhower:

The principle of this approach is to decide if the pending action
is urgent or important or urgent and important or neither urgent
nor important.

5.2

Time Matrix/Eisenhower’s Principle

Covey labeled the four Eisenhower categories “Quadrants” and
introduced the time matrix (Fig. 5.3):

● Quadrant I (QI; top left) contains important, urgent items—
items that need to be dealt with immediately.

● Quadrant II (QII; top right) contains important, but not urgent
items—items that are important but do not require your
immediate attention. This is the quadrant that includes the
necessary actions for your long-term goals.

● In Quadrant III (QIII; bottom left), we have urgent, but unim-
portant items—items that should be minimized or eliminated.
These are the time sucks, the “poor planning on your part does
not constitute an emergency on my part” variety of tasks.

I have two kinds of problems: the urgent and the important. The
urgent are not important, and the important are never urgent.
(Dwight D. Eisenhower 1954)

Page 44

Fig.5.3.eps


34
5 Sorting

I II

III IV

• Crises
• Pressing problems
• Firefighting
• Major scrap and rework
• Deadline-driven projects

• Interruptions
• Some calls
• Some mail
• Some reports
• Some meetings
• Proximate pressing matters
• Popular activities
• Some scrap & rework

• Trivia
• Busy work
• Some mail
• Some phone calls
• Time-wasters
• Pleasant activities

• Prevention
• Production capability activities
• Relationship building
• Recognizing new opportunities
• Planning
• Re-creation

Urgent Not Urgent
Im

po
rt

an
t

N
ot

Im
po

rt
an

t

Fig. 5.3 The time matrix, a simple but very important (and eff ective way) to
sort your inbox. Focus on quadrant II.

● Quadrant IV (QIV; bottom right) contains unimportant and
also not urgent items—items that do not have to be done
anytime soon, perhaps add little to no value, and should be
minimized or eliminated. These are often trivial time wasters.

The next exercise is obvious?!

Exercise 8

Sort all the actions that you have identified in Exercise 7 into the
four quadrants. This is a typical QII action: very important but not
urgent.

Sorting your actions is, however, only the first step and consti-
tutes only the essential basis for a much more important step: you
need to organize your life in way that you spent as much (work-
ing) time as possible in QII, avoid QIV, delegate QIII, and keep QI

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