Download UST GN 2011 - Mercantile Law Proper PDF

TitleUST GN 2011 - Mercantile Law Proper
TagsLetter Of Credit Security Interest Credit (Finance) Banks
File Size3.9 MB
Total Pages262
Table of Contents
                            Q: When should suits for loss or damage of cargo be brought?
A: The suit should be brought within one year from:
Q: What are the rights of stockholders?
A: No, the corporation cannot be sued unless there is bad faith, fraud or negligence present.
Q: When may a corporation issue a replacement certificate of subscription without waiting for the expiration of one year?
	Q: What are the responsibilities of BSP
	F. HOW BSP HANDLES EXCHANGE CRISIS
	Q: What is Legal Tender?
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

LETTERS OF CREDIT


 

 

ACADEMICS CHAIR: LESTER JAY ALAN E. FLORES II  
VICE CHAIRS FOR ACADEMICS: KAREN JOY G. SABUGO & JOHN HENRY C. MENDOZA 
VICE CHAIR FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE: JEANELLE C. LEE 
VICE CHAIRS FOR LAY‐OUT AND DESIGN: EARL LOUIE M. MASACAYAN & THEENA C. MARTINEZ 

 

1U N I V E R S I T Y  O F  S A N T O  T O M A S F a c u l t a d d e D e r e c h o C i v i l  

LETTERS OF CREDIT 
 

I. DEFINITION/CONCEPT 
 

Q: What is Letter of Credit (LC)? 
 
A:  It  is  any  arrangement,  however  named  or 
described, whereby a bank  (issuing bank), acting 
at  the  request  and  on  the  instructions  of  a 
customer  (applicant) or on  its own behalf, binds 
itself to: 
 

1. Pay  to  the order of, or accept and pay 
drafts  drawn  by  a  third  party 
(Beneficiary), or 

2. Authorize  another  bank  to  pay  or  to 
accept and pay such drafts, or 

3. Authorizes  another  bank  to  negotiate, 
against stipulated document(s),  

 
Provided,  the  terms and  conditions of  the  credit 
are  complied  with.  (Art.  2,  Uniform  Customs  & 
Practice for Documentary Credits.) 
 
Note:  They  are  in  effect  absolute  undertakings  to 
pay  the  money  advanced  or  for  the  amount  for 
which  the  credit  is  given  on  the  faith  of  the 
instrument.   
 
Q: What is the duration of LC? 
 
A:  

1. Upon the period fixed by the parties; or 
2. If none is fixed: 

a. 6 months  from  its date  if used  in 
the Philippines; 

b. 12  months  if  used  abroad  (Art 
572, ibid). 

 
Q: What are the kinds of LC?
 
A: 
COMMERCIAL LETTERS 

OF CREDIT 
STANDBY LETTERS OF 

CREDIT 

Involve contracts of sale. 
Involve non‐sale 
transactions. 

Payable upon 
presentation by the 
seller‐beneficiary of 

documents that show he 
has performed his 

contract. 

Payable upon 
certification by the 
beneficiary of the 
applicant’s NON‐
performance of the 

agreement. (Transfield v. 
Luzon Hydro Corp., G.R. 
No. 146717, Nov. 22, 

2004) 
 

 

Q:  Is  irrevocable  letter of  credit  and  confirmed 
letter of credit synonymous? 
 
A:  An  irrevocable  letter  of  credit  is  not 
synonymous with a confirmed  letter of credit.  In 
an  irrevocable  letter  of  credit,  the  issuing  bank 
may not, without  the  consent of  the beneficiary 
and  the  applicant,  revoke  its  undertaking  under 
the  letter,  whereas,  in  a  confirmed  letter  of 
credit, the correspondent bank gives an absolute 
assurance to the beneficiary that it will undertake 
the issuing bank’s obligation as its own according 
to  the  terms  and  condition  of  the  credit. 
(Prudential Bank and Trust Company v.  IAC, G.R. 
No. 74886, Dec. 8, 1992) 
 
Q: Can a court order the release to the applicant 
the  proceeds  of  an  irrevocable  letter  of  credit 
without the consent of the beneficiary?  
 
A: No, such order violates  the  irrevocable nature 
of the letter of credit. The terms of an irrevocable 
letter  of  credit  cannot  be  changed  without  the 
consent of the parties, particularly the beneficiary 
thereof.  (Phil. Virginia Tobacco Administration  v. 
De Los Angeles, G.R. No. L‐27829, Aug. 19, 1988) 
 

II. GOVERNING LAW 
 
Q:  What  is  the  law  governing  letter  of  credit 
(LC)? 
 
A:  It  is  the Uniform Customs  and Practice  (UCP) 
for  documentary  Credits  for  International 
Chamber  of  Commerce  governs  the  Letters  of 
credit (Metropolitan Waterworks vs. Daway, G.R. 
No. 160723, July 21, 2004).  
 
Articles 567 to 572 of the Code of Commerce on 
Letters  of  Credit  are  obsolete.  However,  in  the 
absence  of  any  provision  in  the  Code  of 
Commerce,  commercial  transaction  shall  be 
governed  by  the  usages  and  customs  generally 
observed. (Sec. 2, Code of Commerce) 
 

III. NATURE OF LETTER OF CREDIT 
 
Q: What is the nature and purpose of LC? 
 
A:  To  ensure  certainty  of  payment.  The  seller  is 
assured of payment because the bank  intervenes 
and  makes  the  commitment  to  pay.  This 
addresses problems arising from seller’s refusal to 
part  with  his  goods  before  being  paid  and  the 
buyer’s  refusal  to  part  with  his  money  before 
acquiring the goods, thus, facilitating commercial 
transactions.

Page 2

UST GOLDEN NOTES 2011
 

 

MERCANTILE LAW TEAM:  
ADVISER: ATTY. AMADO E. TAYAG; SUBJECT HEAD: EARL M. LOUIE MASACAYAN;  
ASST. SUBJECT HEADS: KIMVERLY A. ONG & JOANNA MAY D.G. PEÑADA; MEMBERS: MA. ELISA JONALYN A. BARQUEZ, ANGELI R. CARPIO, 
ANTONETTE T. COMIA, ALBAN ROBERT LORENZO F. DE ALBAN, JOEBEN T. DE JESUS, CHRIS JARK ACE M. MAÑO, ANNA MARIE P. OBIETA, 
RUBY ANNE B. PASCUA, FLOR ANGELA T. SABAUPAN, GIAN FRANCES NICOLE C. VILCHES 



Q: What are the essential conditions of LC? 
 
A:  

1. Issued  in favor of a definite person and 
not to order. 

 
Note:  The  Uniform  Commercial  Practice  for 
Documentary Credits allows  letters of credit to 
be payable to order 

 
2. Limited  to a  fixed or  specified amount, 

or to one or more amounts, but with a 
maximum stated limit. (Article 568, Ibid) 

 
Note: If any of these essential conditions is not 
present, the instrument is merely considered as 
a letter of recommendation. 

 
Q:  In  case  the  buyer  was  not  able  to  pay  its 
obligation  under  the  letter  of  credit,  can  the 
bank take possession over the goods covered by 
the said letter of credit? 
 
A: No. The opening of a  Letter of Credit did not 
vest  ownership  of  the  goods  in  the  bank  in  the 
absence of a  trust receipt agreement. A  letter of 
credit  is  a  mere  financial  device  developed  by 
merchants  as  a  convenient  and  relatively  safe 
mode of dealing with the sales of goods to satisfy 
the  seemingly  irreconcilable  interests of a  seller, 
who  refuses  to part with his  goods before he  is 
paid, and a buyer, who wants  to have control of 
the  goods  before  paying.  (Transfield Philippines,
Inc. v. Luzon Hydro Corporation, G.R. No. 146717,
Nov. 22, 2004) 
 

IV. PARTIES TO A LETTER OF CREDIT 
 
Q:  Who  are  the  parties  to  a  Letter  of  Credit 
transaction? 
 
A: 

1. Applicant/Buyer/Importer  –  procures 
the letter of credit, purchases the goods 
and  obliges  himself  to  reimburse  the 
issuing  bank  upon  receipt  of  the 
documents title. 

 
2. Issuing Bank  –  One  which,  whether  a 

paying bank or not,  Issues  the  letter of 
credit and undertakes  to pay  the  seller 
upon  receipt  of  the  draft  and  proper 
documents  of  title  from  the  seller  and 
to  surrender  them  to  the  buyer  upon 
reimbursement. 

 
3. Beneficiary/Seller/Exporter  –  In  whose 

favor  the  instrument  is  executed.  One 
who delivers the documents of title and 

draft  to  the  issuing  bank  to  recover 
payment. 

 
The  number  of  parties  may  be  increased. 
Modern  letters  of  credit  usually  involve 
bank‐to‐bank  transactions.  The  following 
additional parties may be:  

 
1. Advising/notifying bank – The 

correspondent  bank  (agent)  of  the 
issuing  bank  through  which  it  advises 
the beneficiary of the LC. 
 

2. Confirming bank – bank  which,  upon 
the request of the beneficiary, confirms 
the LC issued. 

 
3. Paying bank – bank on which the drafts 

are  to  be  drawn,  which  may  be  the 
issuing bank or another bank not in the 
city of the beneficiary. 

 
4. Negotiating bank – bank  in  the  city  of 

the beneficiary which buys or discounts 
the  drafts  contemplated  by  the  LC,  if 
such  draft  is  to  be  drawn  on  the 
opening  bank  not  in  the  city  of  the 
beneficiary. 

 
Q: What are the stages of LC? 
 
A:  

1. Contract of sale between the buyer and 
seller 

2. Application for LC by the buyer with the 
bank 

3. Issuance of LC by the bank 
4. Shipping of goods by the seller 
5. Execution  of  draft  and  tender  of 

documents by the seller 
6. Redemption  of  draft  (payment)  and 

obtaining  of  documents  by  the  issuing 
bank 

7. Reimbursement  to  the  bank  and 
obtaining of documents by the buyer 

 
A. RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS OF PARTIES 

 
Q: Explain the three  (3) distinct but  intertwined 
contract relationships that are indispensable in a 
letter of credit transaction.  
 
A:   

1. Between the applicant/buyer/importer
and the beneficiary/seller/exporter – The 
applicant/buyer/importer is the one who 
procures  the  letter  of  credit  while  the 
beneficiary/seller/exporter  is  the  one

Page 131

CORPORATION LAW


 

 

U N I V E R S I T Y  O F  S A N T O  T O M A S 
F a c u l t a d d e D e r e c h o C i v i l  

ACADEMICS CHAIR: LESTER JAY ALAN E. FLORES II  
VICE CHAIRS FOR ACADEMICS: KAREN JOY G. SABUGO & JOHN HENRY C. MENDOZA 
VICE CHAIR FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE: JEANELLE C. LEE 
VICE CHAIRS FOR LAY‐OUT AND DESIGN: EARL LOUIE M. MASACAYAN & THEENA C. MARTINEZ 

 

131

Q:  What  are  the  instances  where  corporation 
may acquire its own shares? 
 
A:  

1. To  eliminate  fractional  shares  out  of 
stock dividends; 

2. To  collect  or  compromise  an 
indebtedness to the corporation, arising 
out  of  unpaid  subscription,  in  a 
delinquency  sale  and  to  purchase 
delinquent shares sold during said sale; 

3. To  pay  dissenting  or  withdrawing 
stockholders  (in  the  exercise  of  the 
stockholder’s appraisal right); 

4. To acquire treasury shares; 
5. Redeemable  shares  regardless  of 

existence of retained earnings; 
6. To effect a decrease of capital stock; 
7. In  close  corporations, when  there  is  a 

deadlock  in  the  management  of  the 
business. 
 

(g) INVEST CORPORATE FUNDS IN ANOTHER 
CORPORATION  OR  BUSINESS  FOR  OTHER 
PURPOSE OTHER THAN PRIMARY PURPOSE 
 
Q: What are the requirements? 
   
A:  

1. Approval  by  the  majority  vote  of  the 
BOD or BOT 

2. Ratification  by  stockholders 
representing  at  least  2/3  of  the 
outstanding capital  stock or by at  least 
2/3  of  the  members  in  case  of  non‐
stock corporation 

3. Ratification must be made at a meeting 
duly called for the purposes, and 

4. Prior  written  notice  of  the  proposed 
investment  and  the  time  and  place  of 
the meeting shall be made addressed to 
each stockholder or member by mail or 
by personal service. 
 

Note:  Investment  of  a  corporation  in  a  business 
which  is  in  line  with  its  primary  purpose  requires 
only the approval of the board. 
 
Any dissenting stockholder shall have appraisal right. 
 

 (f)  POWER TO DECLARE DIVIDENDS OUT OF 
UNRESTRICTED RETAINED EARNINGS (URE)  

Q: What are the requirements? 
   
A:  

1. Existence  of  unrestricted  retained 
earnings 

2. Resolution of the board 

3. In  case of  stock dividend,  resolution of 
the board with the concurrence of votes 
representing 2/3 of outstanding capital. 

 
Q: What are unrestricted retained earnings? 
 
A:  These  are  retained  earnings  which  have  not 
been  reserved  or  set  aside  by  the  board  of 
directors for some corporate purpose. 
 
Q: Who are entitled to receive dividends? 
 
A: The stockholders of record date in so far as the 
corporation  is  concerned;  if  there  is  no  record 
date,  the stockholders at  the  time of declaration 
of dividends (not at the time of payment). 
 
Note:  In case of  transfer, dividends declared before 
the  transfer of  shares belong  to  the  transferor and 
those  declared  after  the  transfer  belongs  to  the 
transferee. 
 
Q: Who are entitled to receive dividends in case 
of mortgaged or pledged shares? 
 
A:  

GR:  The mortgagor  or  the  pledgor  has  the 
right to receive the dividends. 
 
XPN:  When  the  mortage  or  pledge  is 
recorded  in the books of the corporation,  in 
such a case then the mortgagee or pledgee is 
entitled to receive the dividends.   

 
Q: What are the forms of dividends? 
 
A:  

1. Cash 
 
Note:  Cash  dividends  due  on  delinquent 
stock  shall  first  be  applied  to  the  unpaid 
balance  on  the  subscription  plus  cost  and 
expenses.   
 

2. Stock 
 
Note: Stock dividends are withheld from the 
delinquent  stockholder  until  his  unpaid 
subscription is fully paid. 
 

3. Property 
 
Note: Stockholders are entitled to dividends 
PRO‐RATA  based  on  the  total  number  of 
shares  and  not  on  the  amount  paid  on 
shares.

Page 132

UST GOLDEN NOTES 2011
 

 

MERCANTILE LAW TEAM:  
ADVISER: ATTY. AMADO E. TAYAG; SUBJECT HEAD: EARL M. LOUIE MASACAYAN;  
ASST. SUBJECT HEADS: KIMVERLY A. ONG & JOANNA MAY D.G. PEÑADA; MEMBERS: MA. ELISA JONALYN A. BARQUEZ, ANGELI R. CARPIO, 
ANTONETTE T. COMIA, ALBAN ROBERT LORENZO F. DE ALBAN, JOEBEN T. DE JESUS, CHRIS JARK ACE M. MAÑO, ANNA MARIE P. OBIETA, 
RUBY ANNE B. PASCUA, FLOR ANGELA T. SABAUPAN, GIAN FRANCES NICOLE C. VILCHES 

132 

Q: When may corporation declare dividends? 
 
A:  

GR: Even if there are existing profits, BOD has 
discretion  to  determine  whether  dividends 
are to be declared. 
 
XPN:  Stock  corporations  are  prohibited  from 
retaining surplus profits  in excess of 100% of 
their paid‐in capital stock. 
 
XPN to XPN: 
1. Definite  corporate  expansion  projects 

approved by the board of directors; 
2. Corporation  is  prohibited  under  any 

loan  agreement  with  any  financial 
institution  or  creditor  from  declaring 
dividends  without  its/his  consent  and 
such consent has not yet been secured; 

3. The retention is necessary under special 
circumstances  obtaining  in  the 
corporation,  such  as  when  there  is  a 
need  for  special  reserve  for  probable 
contingencies. 

 
Q:  What  if  there  is  a  wrongful  or  illegal 
declaration of dividends? 
 
A:  The  Board  of  Directors  is  liable.  The 
stockholders  should  return  the  dividends  to  the 
corporation (solutio indebiti). 
 
Q: What are the sources of dividends? 
 
A:   

GR:  Dividends  can  only  be  declared  out  of 
actual  and  bona fide  unrestricted  retained 
earnings. 
 
XPN: Dividends can be declared out of capital 
in the following instances: 
1. Dividends  from  investments  wasting 

assets corporation; 
2. Liquidating dividends 

 
Q: What are the sources of retained earnings? Is 
it available for dividends? 
 
A: 
SOURCES OF RETAINED 

EARNINGS 
AVAILABILITY FOR 

DIVIDENDS 
Paid in surplus – It is the 
difference between the 
par value and the issued 
value or selling price of 

the shares 

It cannot be declared 
as cash dividend but 

can be declared only as 
stock dividends 

Revaluation surplus – 
Increase in the value of a 
fixed asset as a result of 
its appreciation. They are 

by nature subject to 
fluctuations. 

Cannot be declared as 
dividends because 

there is no actual gain 
(gain in paper only). 

Reduction surplus – the 
surplus arises from the 

reduction of the par value 
of the issued shares of 

stocks. 
 

It cannot be declared 
as cash dividend but 

can be declared only as 
stock dividends 

Gain from Sale of Real
Property

Available as dividends 

Treasury Shares

Cannot be declared as 
stock or cash dividends 
but it may be declared 
as property dividend 

Operational Income
Income

Available as dividends 

 
Q: Distinguish cash and stock dividends. 
 
A: 

CASH DIVIDENDS STOCK DIVIDENDS 
Part of general fund Part of capital 
Results in cash outlay No cash outlay 

Not subject to levy by 
corporate creditors 

Once issued, can be levied 
by corporate creditors 
because they’re part of 

corporate capital 
Declared only by the 
board of directors at 

its discretion 
(majority of the 
quorum only, not 
majority of all the 

board) 

Declared by the board 
with the concurrence of 

the stockholders 
representing at least 2/3 
of the outstanding capital 
stock at a regular/special 

meeting 
Does not increase the 
corporate capital 

Corporate capital is 
increased 

Its declaration creates 
a debt from the 

corporation to each of 
its stockholders 

No debt is created by its 
declaration 

If received by 
individual: subject to 

tax; 
If received by 

corporation: not 
subject to tax 

Not subject to tax either 
received by individual or a 

corporation 

Cannot be revoked 
after announcement 

Can be revoked despite 
announcement but before 

issuance 

Applied to the unpaid 
balance of delinquent 

shares 

Can be withheld until 
payment of unpaid 

balance of delinquent 
shares 

 
Note: For  the purposes of  this distinction, property 
dividends are considered as cash dividends.

Page 261

INDEX


  

  261
U N I V E R S I T Y  O F  S A N T O  T O M A S 

F a c u l t a d d e D e r e c h o C i v i l  

ACADEMICS CHAIR: LESTER JAY ALAN E. FLORES II  
VICE CHAIRS FOR ACADEMICS: KAREN JOY G. SABUGO & JOHN HENRY C. MENDOZA 
VICE CHAIR FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE: JEANELLE C. LEE 
VICE CHAIRS FOR LAY‐OUT AND DESIGN: EARL LOUIE M. MASACAYAN & THEENA C. MARTINEZ 

Non‐competing goods                                       220 
Non‐prejudicial disclosure                                205 
Parallel importer                                                 211 
Patent                                                                   204 
Patentable Inventions                                       205 
Person of ordinary skill                                     206 
Plagiarism                                                            235 
Presumption of authorship                              226 
Prior art                                                               205 
Prior user                                                             210 
Priority date                                                        208 
Published works                                                 234 
Regional exhaustion                                          211 
Related goods principle                                    218 
Reverse reciprocity of foreign law                  210 
Substantial reproduction                                  235 
Technology transfer arrangement                  204 
Test of non‐obviousness                                   206 
Totality or holistic test                                       218 
Trademark                                                           215 
Trademark infringement                                   219 
Tradename                                                          222 
Undisclosed information                                  204 
Unfair competition                                            221 
Unity of invention                                              208 
Utility model                                                       206 
Voluntary licensing                                            213 

L. SPECIAL LAWS 

After‐acquired properties                                 236 
After‐incurred obligations                                236 
Covered institutions                                           243 
Domestic market enterprise                             247 
Export Enterprise                                                247 
Foreign Investment Negative List                    248 
Money Laundering                                             244 
Non‐Philippine nationals                                   247 
Once a week for three consecutive weeks    240 
Philippine nationals                                            247 
Recto Law                                                             237 
Suspicious Transactions                                     243

Page 262

UST GOLDEN NOTES 2011
 

 

MERCANTILE LAW TEAM:  
ADVISER: ATTY. AMADO E. TAYAG; SUBJECT HEAD: EARL M. LOUIE MASACAYAN;  
ASST. SUBJECT HEADS: KIMVERLY A. ONG & JOANNA MAY D.G. PEÑADA; MEMBERS: MA. ELISA JONALYN A. BARQUEZ, ANGELI R. CARPIO, 
ANTONETTE T. COMIA, ALBAN ROBERT LORENZO F. DE ALBAN, JOEBEN T. DE JESUS, CHRIS JARK ACE M. MAÑO, ANNA MARIE P. OBIETA, 
RUBY ANNE B. PASCUA, FLOR ANGELA T. SABAUPAN, GIAN FRANCES NICOLE C. VILCHES 

262 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Amador, Vicente. Intellectual Property Fundamentals, Quezon City: C & E Pub., 2007. 
 
Aquino, Timoteo. Philippine Corporate Law Compendium. Manila: Rex Bookstore, Inc., 2006. 
 
Correa, Carlos . “Internationalization of the Patent System and New Technologies”.  
 
De Leon, Hector S. Insurance Code Annotated. Manila: Rex Book Store, 2006. 
 
De Leon & De Leon, Jr. The Corporation Code of the Philippines. Manila: Rex Bookstore Inc., 2006. 
 
Divina, Nilo T., Handbook in Philippine Commercial Laws. Quezon City: CIBI Information, Inc., 2010. 
 
Diaz, Noli C., Transportation Laws: Notes and Cases. Manila: Rex Book Store, Inc., 2001. 
  International Law Journal , Vol. 20. No.3 , 2002. 
 
Insurance Memorandum Circular No. 4‐2006. Issued June 26, 2006. 
 
Perez, Hernando B. The Insurance Code and Insolvency law: with comments and annotations. Manila: Rex  
  Bookstore Inc., 2006. 
 
Perez, Hernando B. Quizzer and Reviewer on Corporation Code, The Securities Regulation Code and Related  
  Laws. Manila: Rex Bookstore Inc., 2000. 
 
Pineda, Ernesto L. Credit Transaction and Quasi‐contracts. Quezon City: Central Book Supply. 2006. 
 
Salao, Ernesto C. Essentials of Intellectual Property Law: a Guidebook on Republic Act No. 8293 and Related 
  Laws, Manila: Rex Book Store, 2008. 
 
Sundiang and Aquino. Commercial Law Reviewer. Manila: Rex Bookstore, Inc., 2009.  
 
Sundiang and Aquino. Reviewer in Commercial Law. Manila: Rex Bookstore, Inc., 2006. 
 
SEC Memorandum Circular no. 6 Series of 2009 
 
Villanueva, Cesar L. Commercial Law Reviewer. Manila: Rex Book Store, 1994. 
 
Villanueva, Cesar L. Commercial Law Reviewer. Manila: Rex Book Store, 2001. 
 
Villanueva, Cesar L. Commercial Law Reviewer. Manila: Rex Book Store, 2009. 
 
http://www.chanrobles.com 
 
http://www.lawphil.net 
 
http://www.sc.judiciary.gov.ph

Similer Documents